Black Women + Creativity Interview #10 with Elizabeth J. Elie (Lizzie G)

The Black Women and Creativity interview series is focused on inspiring Black women to tap into their creativity capacity. Our intention is to talk to one hundred Black women, from all walks of life, to share their advice on the creative process.

Elizabeth Elie, also known as Lizzie G, is the CEO and President of Lizzie G Entertainment, LLC. She has worked alongside Chicago Public Schools, Walgreens Expressions Challenge, University of Chicago’s Logan Center of Art and Vitalant-IL. Lizzie G has a powerful message for young people to understand that they can express their talents while gaining an education. She holds a Master’s Degree in Integrated Marketing Communication. To learn more about Lizzie G and her company follow her on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook ! You can also check her music out on YouTube, Soundcloud, and Spotify !

What does it mean to be creative? 

Lizzie G: To be creative one must understand their self first. Once you understand yourself you have the opportunity to change your perspective and solve problems in a new way and in a new environment. Being creative means taking risks, ignoring doubt and facing our fears. It means breaking with routine and stepping out of our comfort zone to do something different – for the sake of doing something different. As one of the few positive female hip-hop artists on the scene, my goal is to spread a message of positivity, and I do that through my company LIZZIE G ENTERTAINMENT. Through my music, I took a creative approach that artists in Chicago weren’t doing. My music promotes anti-bullying, keeping peace and staying united. I use my platform to encourage today’s youth to stay in school and pursue their dreams. I wanted to choose a platform where I am sending a positive message, good vibes and not using profanity to emphasize my messages in music.

What advice/wisdom/encouragement/insight would you have to Black women about navigating their own creative process?

Lizzie G: Everyone has their timing in life for success. As long as you stay dedicated to your craft, passion and dreams your break thru is forthcoming. Network, always promote yourself and never burn bridges. Keep God first,  stay positive in life and your Level Up will surely come in time.

Want to catch a Lizzie G perform? On July 6, Lizzie will be opening for TINK at the Festival of Live in Chicago. Get tickets here and check her out!

Black Women + Creativity Interview #9 with Brandy Hazzard

The Black Women and Creativity interview series is focused on inspiring Black women to tap into their creativity capacity. Our intention is to talk to one hundred Black women, from all walks of life, to share their advice on creativity by answering two simple questions.

Brandy Hazzard is a licensed Esthetician and has been one for 6 years. Her creativity spans fashion and beauty. While being a makeup artist , she is a fashion stylist to the everyday woman. Her experience in HR is setting the stage for having her own business as a Beauty Mogul. You can find her on IG and FB (@beautyxbrandy) and Twitter (@BXBChi) Her site is www.beautyxbrandy.com

What does it mean to be creative ?

Brandy: To me it means that you think outside the box to get an answer. A creative is a complex human being. They see the world differently than a logical person. Most see the world in their creative form.

What advice / wisdom/ encouragement / insight would you give to Black women about navigating their own creative process ?

Brandy: Give yourself some grace. Everything will not be what you want it to be when you want it to be. I’ve learned through therapy that I need to give myself grace because everything cannot be perfect. Something will happen good or bad. The same day that you plant your garden isn’t when you will reap the harvest. I’m a mom, fiancé, I work 9 – 5, and own my beauty business. Somewhere in there I have to take care of myself and invest in me outside of everyone else. I cannot be the best if I am pouring from an empty cup.

Are you or someone you know interested in being featured in the Black Women + Creativity Series? Email kandice@kandicecole.com with “Black Women + Creativity” in the subject line!

Black Women + Creativity Interview #8 with Jessica Williams

The Black Women and Creativity interview series is focused on inspiring Black women to tap into their creativity. Our intention is to talk to one hundred Black women, from all walks of life, to share their advice on creativity in two question micro-interviews.

Our eighth interview is with Jessica Williams, founder of Tech Biz Gurl. She empowers women to use technology to pursue their passions. You can find her writing and speaking about side hustles, technology, and self care. Learn more about Jess over at techbizgurl.com

What does it mean to be creative?

I think creative means to create, in whatever form, that means to you whether it is writing, painting, coloring, making something with your hands, or brainstorming.  We are all creative in different ways.  It is whatever fuels your soul in a way that you feel connected to something bigger than yourself. 

What one piece of advice/wisdom/encouragement/insight would you have to Black women about navigating their own creative process?

You are creative.  We all are.  I’ve often thought that I wasn’t creative because I couldn’t draw or paint, but creativity is so much more than a skill.  It’s more of a feeling.  As Black women, it’s often hard to tap into that because there is pressure for us to be strong which often means holding things in, taking care of everyone else, and not leaving much leftover for ourselves.  Taking time for #selfcare helps you get back in tune with your inner voice and helps you remember those things that help you feel at peace with yourself.  Often by getting silent and spending time with ourselves, we come up with ideas and get back to those special things that make us who we are. 

Thank you for sharing this powerful take on creativity Jess!

Know someone that we should feature on the next Black Women + Creativity interview? Email me at kandice@kandicecole.com!

Black Women + Creativity Interview #7 with Asia Monique

The Black Women and Creativity interview series is focused on inspiring Black women to tap into their creativity capacity. Our intention is to talk to one hundred Black women, from all walks of life, to share their advice on creativity by answering two simple questions.

Going by the motto “big hair, bigger vocals,” Chicago vocalist Asia Monique is making waves with her lustrous mix of soulful vocals, “traphouse jazz” production and dark elements. I am excited to have her over on the UBG Collective blog for our seventh Black Women + Creativity interview! Make sure to follow Asia Monique on all of her social media profiles.

What does it mean to be creative?

Asia Monique: It means to have an imagination. A dream, an actual vision, that’s being exercised/used. A creative – can give you vision or insight you weren’t even expecting and/or can take a thing that someone was having trouble visualizing and build it out.

What one piece of advice/wisdom/encouragement/insight would you give to Black women about navigating their own creative process? 

Asia Monique: We are so innovative, so intelligent, so creative that we forget. As an entrepreneur/artist, or even in corporate, we are so used to giving our gifts to someone else to further their vision and we forget about our own. Our “why.” I would just want to encourage my fellow sisters to remind them that they don’t have to give all of their gems to someone else. Make sure that you set aside time to focus on yourself as well and that your why is still at the core of what you deliver. 

Thank you for dropping these gems Asia! Make sure to like, comment, and share if you are enjoyed the latest installment of the Black Women + Creativity Series!

Black Women + Creativity Interview #6 with Dr. Adrianne Scruggs

The Black Women and Creativity interview series is focused on inspiring Black women to tap into their creativity capacity. Our intention is to talk to one hundred Black women, from all walks of life, to share their advice on creativity by answering the two simple questions.

Our sixth interview is with Dr. Adrianne Scruggs, physician and private practice owner of MD One Internal Medicine Associates in Pearland, TX. She is devoted to giving excellent medical care and creating genuine connections with her patients. She is also a wife and mother of two. Learn more about her practice at www.mdoneprimarycare.com

What does it mean to be creative?

Dr. Adrianne: To have the ability, resources, and support to manifest or produce an idea that is unique and inspires others.

What one piece of advice/wisdom/encouragement/insight would you give to Black women about navigating their own creative process? 

Dr. Adrianne: Please don’t be discouraged by the naysayers. Your tribe exists; they understand you deeply and want to connect with you… Please leave space in your day, week, month to be uninhibited – to imagine freely… Take notes – write them down or record them… Create what YOU love, not what you THINK someone else will love. 

What is your one takeaway after reading Adrianne’s take on creativity? Share below!

Are you being humble or hiding?

I often hear successful people talk about the importance of being humble. Humble is defined as “showing a modest or low estimate of one’s own importance.”  In my mind, this is about doing your best work without needing the applause of others. It is about learning to cancel out the noise and do your work regardless of who is or isn’t looking at you. With this kind of posture, you never “fully arrive” but always are willing to learn, explore, and stretch yourself to be and do better.

Keep in mind that being humble doesn’t mean that you don’t do the work. Humility isn’t hiding. The most humble performers still perform. The most humble actors still act. The most humble entrepreneurs still do business and make money.  Being humble doesn’t stop you from doing your thing. Humility doesn’t impede on you making progress.

Hiding is something different. It is all to easy to think that you are being humble when you are straight up hiding. I have to call myself out on this daily.  In an effort not to “toot my own horn” I have not shared, not served, and not shined my light as brightly as I could. I have waited for someone to notice me rather than put the spotlight on myself. Hiding looks like concealing what you do. Hiding looks like trying to make it absolutely perfect before you share it (which usually means you never share it). Hiding looks like procrastinating on the one thing you really want to do.  This is right in line with the definition of hiding which is “to put or keep out of sight conceal from the view of others.” You are keeping your head down not to work and focus on your craft, but to make sure that no one sees your face. When you hide, you aren’t acting on the potential that you within you.

Photo: CreateHer Stock

Make it a practice to check in with yourself. Are you being humble or are you really hiding? Know that you can be gracious about your craft and still slay. Queen Bey shows us this time and time again. You can be humble and expand into your dreams. You can practice humility and secure the bag. You can be humble and do what you want. But when you hide, you prevent yourself from getting all of that goodness you deserve Sis.

There are times when you need to be a little less nice and a little more bold. Times when you need to share who you are. When you need to work on your passions without blocking your own flow. We can get so used to posturing ourselves and bending to everybody else’ expectations of us that we think this is the norm. Anything outside of that not only feels different but a little uncomfortable and wrong. Let it be uncomfortable so that you can unlearn this belief that you have to hide your brilliance. You are meant for more. You know what you want to do. It’s time to do it.

Stay humble. Shine unapologetically. Live free.

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Black Women + Creativity Interview #5 with Tamyra Andrews

The Black Women and Creativity interview series is focused on inspiring Black women to tap into their creativity capacity. Our intention is to talk to one hundred Black women, from all walks of life, to share their advice on creativity by answering the two simple questions.

Our fifth interview is with Tamyra Andrews, Creator of My Helps the People. She’s a humorist vlogger, speaker and author. To learn more about Tamyra check her out on social media !

What does it mean to be creative? 

Tamyra: To be creative means that your brain, spirit, and natural gifting(s) have collaborated to cause you to produce something that didn’t exist previously. By “didn’t exist” I don’t mean reinventing the wheel. For example, if you’ve written a book, obviously you didn’t invent books. But your book from your brain with your perspective did not previously exist in the world. It would have never existed without you creating it. 

What advice/wisdom/encouragement/insight would you have to Black women about navigating their own creative process?

Tamyra: Timing is everything. I live by that in general, but specifically in the creative process. It’s important to know when you’re working too fast or too slow; or if you’ve released your creations into the world prematurely or too late. You have to stay in tune with yourself to recognize the right timing. 

Make sure to like, comment, and share!

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Black Women + Creativity Interview #4 with Dr. Denise Moore Revel

The Black Women and Creativity interview series is focused on inspiring Black women to tap into their creativity capacity. Our intention is to talk to one hundred Black women, from all walks of life, to share their advice on the creative process.

Our fourth interview features Dr. Denise Moore Revel, the Self Discovery Specialist and author of Own Your Amazing. Dr. Denise is passionate about helping women discover their unique value and find their purpose. Find out more about what Dr. Denise over on Facebook and get a copy of her latest book!

What does it mean to be creative? 

Dr. Denise: When I think of what it means to be creative, the first word that comes to mind is freedom. To be creative is to allow myself the freedom to fully express who I am. When I allow myself to be creative, there are no preconceived ideas or rules to follow. Being creative is the unleashing of my innermost self.

I also think to be creative is an example of self-discovery. It’s discovering what is uniquely inside of me. Being creative is the witnessing of something that’s never been seen before.

 What one piece of advice/wisdom/encouragement/insight would you give to Black women about navigating their own creative process? 

Dr. Denise: The one piece of encouragement I would give Black women about navigating their creative process is to allow the process to unfold in the way that works best for them. They should not focus on how the creative process happens for others, but to accept their process as uniquely theirs. For example, my creative process usually involves me writing ideas down on paper, putting the paper away for a few days so I can reflect and ponder the ideas. After a few days, I go back to the ideas and see which ones still resonates with me.

I also understand my creative process needs to be flexible.  I have learned that I need to allow my creative process to change as I evolve and grow as a woman.

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Black Women + Creativity Interview #3 with Temara Moore

The Black Women and Creativity interview series is focused on inspiring Black women to tap into their creativity capacity. Our intention is to talk to one hundred Black women, from all walks of life, to share their advice on creativity by answering the two simple questions.

Our third interview is with Temara Moore, founder of Cloud 9 Bookkeeping and Tax, LLC and my bestie! In addition to helping small businesses get their accounting together, she makes jewelry, does genealogy research, and writes books. Learn more about her company at https://www.cloud9bookkeepingtax.com/

What does it mean to be creative? 

Temara: To be creative is to ignore the voice in your subconscious that creates excuses.  When you ignore it, there’s nothing telling you that your ideas are silly or impossible.  As an accountant, my creativity comes into play when I see clients clinging to processes that are inefficient and outdated. I create new systems for their own unique situation.  When you deal in numbers, it’s easy to get stuck in old school ruts.  Math is centuries old and it’s one of the few things that will never change.  However, we can change the way that math works for us.

What one piece of advice/wisdom/encouragement/insight would you give to Black women about navigating their own creative process?

Temara: We should trust our guts.  For me, second thoughts are usually just variations of my first and more authentic thought.  The first thought is shot down and revised by my subconscious.  If you have a brilliant idea or a deep longing to pursue something, you’ll notice that idea or longing never goes away until it’s fulfilled.  Act on those first thoughts because in my experience, the second and third revisions of my true desires never measure up to the original.

Black Women + Creativity Interview #2 with Joyy Norris

The Black Women and Creativity interview series is focused on inspiring Black women to tap into their creativity capacity. Our intention is to talk to one hundred Black women, from all walks of life, to share their advice on creativity by answering the two simple questions.

Our next interview is with Joyy Norris. I have known Joyy for over a decade and she is the definition of #BlackGirlMagic. Joyy Norris is a Chicago born and reared photographer, filmmaker, writer and producer with a mind for storytelling across platforms. She works in documentary, podcasting, film curation and programming and freelance writing. Learn more about her work over at www.joyynorris.com and on Twitter and IG.

Read on for some of Joyy’s insight about the creative process.

What does it mean to be creative?

Joyy: Being creative is being able to use your natural born gifts to create original ideas and bring them into manifestation.

What advice/wisdom/encouragement/insight would you give to Black women about navigating their own creative process?

Joyy: Spend as much time as possible getting to know your creative triggers so you can intentionally activate them and work to sustain your creative flow. Also, invest in yourself, through workshops, walks in nature, engaging with art other than yours, solo time, saving toward financially liberating goal, etc. to build your reservoir of knowledge and capital to grow your creativity and creative endeavors.

Thank you for blessing us with your wisdom Joyy! Like, share, and comment about this week’s interview!

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